The Logical Reasoning Section plays a very significant role in clearing the CLAT Exam. Go through the article to know all about the CLAT Logical Reasoning and get all the CLAT Logical Reasoning Preparation Tips and Strategies that will boost your preparation and increase your chances of selection in the exam. Common-Law Admission Test (CLAT) is the examination which is conducted by the amalgamation of the participation of 21 law schools for admission in the 22 National Law Universities across India. 

CLAT Logical Reasoning Preparation Tips

  • According to the CLAT Exam Pattern, there are about 28-32 questions in total in the logical reasoning section.
  • The important topics for this section are logical sequences, verbal reasoning, syllogisms, Inference related questions, Coding or Decoding, Data Interpretation, and Statement Conclusion.
  • It is advisable to practice previous years CLAT Question Papers and mock tests.
  • Time management and clearing of concepts are crucial aspects that need to be done before sitting for the exam.

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CLAT New Pattern and Syllabus for Logical Reasoning

The Logical Reasoning section of CLAT will consist of passages that will be within 300 words. This passage will be followed by more than one question and will be scored accordingly.

  • These questions will allow the candidate to recognize, understand, and conclude an argument;
  • Diagnose the arguments in the passage;
  • A critical assessment of reasoning along with the analyzation of how the conclusions can alter depends on specific evidence;
  • Deduce inferences from the passage and apply it to different situations;
  • Identification of equivalence and contradictions, inferring analogies and relationships and analyzing the efficacy of arguments.

CLAT Logical Reasoning Preparation Tips

It is important to have a proper plan while aiming for the CLAT examination. Like any other examination, apart from patience and determination, a few tricks and tips are needed to crack the examination. Logical reasoning is the most scoreable section of CLAT and a major part of it depends on your approach. You can take into consideration the tips given below. 

  • Clear your concepts and understand the foundation of the topics that are included in the syllabus.
  • Refer to good books that are well-approved.
  • You must learn to manage time. You can do this by timing yourself when you solve practice question papers.
  • Practice thoroughly on a regular basis and solve as many mock test papers and previous year papers as possible.

Meanwhile, you should also go through the CLAT English Preparation Tips to enhance your preparation in the Reasoning Section.

CLAT Logical Reasoning Practice Questions

For the preparation of the Logical Reasoning for CLAT to be successful, it is essential to solve and practise some sample questions from the papers that are given by CLAT. It is a necessary part of the preparation and should be taken seriously. To aid you in your preparation, a few sample questions along with Illustration Question Set are given below.

Sample questions

  1. Rahul Dravid, the head coach of India’s Under-19 cricket team, explained that the 2018 Under-19 World Cup team selection strategy was about providing opportunities to a lot more players to come into the India Under-19 fold. He explained that more than winning — which is not the right touchstone of success of a program at this level — what matters is how many of the players are able to move to the next level, which is playing first-class cricket. He, therefore, made a conscious decision to not select players from the previous World Cup to the 2018 Under-19 World Cup squad.

 1.1   Which one of the following statements is consistent with Dravid’s selection strategy for the 2018 Under-19 World Cup as stated above?  

(a) Selecting an inexperienced team at the under-19 level ensures failure and players who experience failure learn to be humble.

(b) Playing a sport is more important than winning or losing.

(c) The Under-19 World Cup is a stepping-stone to first-class cricket and winning it should not be the end-goal.

(d) When players are under the age of 19, they do not feel stressed about playing at a World Cup; however, as they age, their ability to play well depends on the number of matches they have already played.

1.2   Which of the following is the most desirable outcome of Dravid’s selection strategy from his perspective? 

 (a) The team losing the World Cup, but 5 players from the squad going on to play first-class cricket.

 (b) The team winning the World Cup, and 1 player getting selected for the national team.

(c) The team winning the World Cup, and no player getting selected for the next Under-19 World Cup team.

 (d) The team winning the World Cup, and 5 players from the squad going on to play first-class cricket.

1.3   Which of the following statements, if true, contradicts Dravid’s selection strategy? 

 (a) First-class cricket selectors evaluate under-19 cricketers based on the win-loss ratio of the team they were a part of.

(b) First-class cricket selectors evaluate under-19 cricketers based on their ability to cope with injuries.

(c) First-class cricket selectors evaluate under-19 cricketers based on their individual performances.

(d) Players who have played in international tournaments face domestic competition better than those who have not.

  1. Gayatri: Maharana Pratap was courageous no doubt, but his forces lost to the forces of Emperor Akbar the Great in the Battle of Haldighati. The king of a region such as Mewar and the Emperor of most of the Indian sub-continent at the time cannot both be eligible for the title, ‘the Great’, given the historical context.

Ranjini: Pratap never surrendered to Akbar in his lifetime despite Akbar sending several envoys to his great rival with the offer of making him a Mughal ally. Pratap’s defiance gave other Rajput rulers the courage to refuse alliance with Akbar. The victory in the Battle of Haldighati was a hollow victory for Akbar at best. Pratap’s forces were outnumbered by Akbar’s by far in the battle, but Pratap escaped with his life and subsequently recovered much of the territory lost in the battle. Maharana Pratap the Great received recognition of his greatness from none other than Emperor Akbar the Great. The latter is known to have wept on hearing the news of his rival’s death.

  2.1 In support of which of the following does Gayatri state the fact that Maharana Pratap’s forces lost to the forces of Emperor Akbar the Great?

(a) Maharana Pratap was not courageous

(b) Mewar is a smaller region in comparison to the Indian sub-continent

(c) Maharana Pratap does not deserve the title ‘the Great’

(d)  Akbar defeated Pratap in the battle

2.2 Ranjini’s statement that Pratap subsequently recovered much of the territory lost in the battle plays which one of the following roles?

(a) Forms the conclusion of Ranjini’s argument that Pratap was courageous

(b) Forms a premise for Ranjini’s argument that Pratap does not deserve the title ‘the Great’

(c) Offers a clarification on who actually won the battle between the forces of Akbar and Pratap

(d) Forms a premise for Ranjini’s argument that the outcome of the battle of Haldighati was not of much consequence

2.3 Which of the following is the main conclusion of Ranjini’s statements?

(a) Pratap is also deserving of the title, ‘the Great’

(b) Akbar does not deserve the title, ‘the Great’.

(c) Akbar had no rival greater than Pratap

(d) Pratap did not care about the outcome of the Battle of Haldighati

2.4 The patterns of reasoning in Gayatri’s argument closely resembles the pattern of reasoning in all of the following except?

(a) Sir Donald Bradman is the greatest batsman to have ever played Test cricket. Sachin Tendulkar was hugely successful against most bowling attacks, but his batting average of 53.78 in test matches disqualifies him from holding the same status in Test cricket as Sir Bradman who averaged 99.9.

(b) Rafael Nadal and Roger Federer are two of the greatest tennis players of all time. While Nadal has a better record against Federer when they have played against each other, Federer has won more grand slams.

(c) There can be no dispute about Diego Maradona’s legendary skills as a footballer, but in terms of international football, he cannot be compared with Pele because Pele scored 77 goals in 92 matches, whereas Maradona only managed 34 goals in 91 matches.

(d) It is true that Maria Sharapova is a fierce competitor and has had a storied career in international tennis. However, with Serena Williams’ 19-2 head-to-head lead over Maria Sharapova, Serena is by far the most dominant woman to have played tennis and Maria Sharapova has done nothing to threaten that domination.

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Illustration Question Set

  1. In South Asia the ruling classes ignore the quotidian at their own peril. Just ask them about onions. This autumn the humble bulb has challenged titans. The trouble began when unseasonably heavy rains followed drought across the onion-growing belt of north and central India. That not only all but destroyed the crop; the wet caused more than a third of onions in storage to rot. The result is a severe shortage of onions across India, as a result of which prices more than tripled. This hardly threatens famine – something the green revolution abolished decades ago by boosting wheat and rice yields. Yet remove the onion and you struggle to imagine Indian cuisine. It forms the base for curries and biryanis. When a poor Indian has nothing else to eat, at least she has an onion with a chapati or two. In late September the Indian government slapped a ban on exports of onions. That briefly brought down prices, helping consumers. But it has angered farmers and exporters in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka, for whom onions are an essential cash crop. In South Asia, a region riven by geopolitical fault lines, there are international implications. Upon hearing of India’s export ban, Bangladesh’s strong woman, Sheikh Hasina Wajed, admonished the Indian government for giving no warning. Her country counts on Indian onions, whose price at one point had risen fivefold in the markets of Dhaka, Bangladesh’s capital. [Extracted, with edits and revisions, from “Banyan: Tight bulb moment”, The Economist, Vol. 433, No. 9172, December 7, 2019.]

1.1 Which of the following forms the premise for the author’s argument that a shortage of onions would not cause a famine in India today?

(a)India can ban exports of onions, thereby ensuring adequate supply.

(b)India can always import onions from its neighboring countries.

(c)Onions are only used for flavour in Indian cuisine, and are not the main staple.

(d)There are enough wheat and rice for people to eat in India today because of the green revolution.

(Answer: (d))

 Rationale: The correct answer is (d) – there is enough wheat and rice for people to eat in India today because of the green revolution. The author states this towards the beginning of the third paragraph. While each of the other options may be true, the author does not base the conclusion that a shortage of onions would not cause a famine in India today, on any of the statements set out in the other options. Therefore, none of (a), (b), or (c) can be the correct answer.

1.2 Which of the following is most likely to be true had heavy rains not followed drought across the onion-growing regions of India?

(a)Bangladesh would not have needed to import onions from India.

(b)There would not have been a shortage of onions in India.

(c)The onion harvest in storage would not have rotted.

(d)The onion crop would not have been destroyed.

(Answer: (c))

Rationale: The correct answer is (c) – the onion harvest in storage would not have rotted. We can infer this from the author’s statement that “the wet caused more than a third of onions in storage to rot”. There is nothing in the passage to indicate that Bangladesh would not have needed to import onions from India had the rains not followed the drought, and so, (a) cannot be the correct answer. It was a combination of the heavy rains and the preceding drought that caused a shortage of onions (and not either of these reasons alone), and so, (b) cannot be the correct answer. The onion crop was destroyed by the drought, not the rains, and so, (d) cannot be the correct answer either.

1.3 Which of the following can we infer from the passage above?

(a)Farmers in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka do not mind receiving lower prices from the sale of onions to ensure adequate supply of onions in India.

(b)Farmers in states other than Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka do not cultivate onions.

(c)Farmers in Gujarat, Maharashtra and Karnataka have been forced to cultivate onions because of the policies of the Indian government.

(d)Farmers in Gujarat, Maharashtra, and Karnataka care more about earning money through selling onions than ensuring adequate supply of onions in India.

(Answer: (d))

 Rationale: The correct answer is (d) – farmers in Gujarat, Maharashtra, and Karnataka care more about earning money through exporting onions than ensuring an adequate supply of onions in India. We can infer this because of the author’s statement about how the ban on export of onions brought down prices but angered farmers in these states, who view onions as an important cash crop. Since option (a) directly contradicts this statement, (a) cannot be the correct answer. There is nothing in the passage to support either (b) or (c), and so, neither of these can be the correct answer.

1.4 Which of the following solutions, if employed by the Bangladesh government, would counter the effect of the ban on onion exports by India on the prices of onions in Dhaka’s markets?

(a)Prohibit onion cultivation in Bangladesh.

(b)Increase imports of onions from other countries.

(c)Close the market on alternate days.

(d)None of the above.

(Answer: (b))

 Rationale: The correct answer is (b) – increase imports of onions from other countries. The price of onions would reduce with an increase in their supply. Option (a) would have the opposite effect, that is, it would result in a reduction of supply, and so, (a) cannot be the correct answer. Option (c) would not affect the supply of, or demand for, onions either, and so, this cannot be the correct answer. Since (b) is likely to counter the effect of the ban, for the reasons discussed, (d) cannot be the correct answer.

1.5 Which of the following most accurately expresses the main point of the passage?

(a)Onions are not an important crop for either India or Bangladesh.

(b)The Bangladeshi government habitually opposes India’s export policies, and the ban on onion exports is the most recent example of such opposition.

(c)Adverse weather has affected the availability of onions in India, leading to cascading effects, including in neighbouring countries.

(d)Onions form a very important part of India’s diet, and in the absence of anything else, an Indian can always eat onions with chapatis.

(Answer: (c))

Rationale: The correct answer is (c) - adverse weather has affected the availability of onions in India, leading to cascading effects, including in neighbouring countries. The author discusses the reason for the shortage of onions in India, how the government’s ban on exports affected farmers and exporters in India, as well as the impact upon prices of onions in Bangladesh, and the reaction of the government of Bangladesh to the ban. Since option (c) is the only option that addresses all these points, it is the correct answer. Option (a) contradicts the author’s description of how important onions are to an Indian’s diet, and so, cannot be the correct answer. There is nothing to indicate that the Bangladeshi government habitually opposes India’s export policies – the only instance we have is of their opposition to the ban on the export of onions, and so, (b) cannot be the correct answer. While (d) may be true, it only touches upon one of the points the author discusses in the passage, rather than expressing the author’s main point, and so, (d) cannot be the correct answer.

CLAT Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers PDF

Check the table below for the CLAT Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers PDFs-

CLAT Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers PDF
CLAT Logical Reasoning Questions and Answers PDF

CLAT Preparation Strategies

Even though the section of Logical Reasoning for CLAT 2021 has changed immensely, some type of questions will be retained. For example- questions related to syllogisms can be repeated. In this case, it is advisable to practice the previous year’s papers just as a cautionary measure. Also, go through the CLAT Maths Preparation Tips to boost your Mathematics Section preparation.

  • The Logical Reasoning section in CLAT is greatly entwined with the Legal Reasoning and English Language. As such, you can use this aspect to your advantage by preparing for all three sections from the same source. Editorial and opinion pieces from magazines and newspapers will help you a great deal. You can use these sources to sharpen your Logical Reasoning knowledge by asking yourself questions. These questions can be – What is the chief point indicated in the passage? What are the arguments that the passage provides? What is the author's view of the piece? and many more. By taking the help of others, in the form of small debates, you will be able to know about various viewpoints with proper premise and conclusion. This will aid you in broadening your horizons and enhance your knowledge.
  • The most vital practice papers are undoubtedly the Model papers that are offered by the CLAT Consortium. Apart from this, you can also practice the previous year's question papers from the LNAT and the LSAT. Although the examinations are quite different, it will help you to practice and know more about the topic of logical reasoning. Only with repeated practice can you excel in this section.

Meanwhile, you should also go through the CLAT Legal Aptitude Preparation Tips to enhance your preparation in the Reasoning Section.

How to Attempt CLAT Logical Reasoning Questions

There are several ways that you can attempt the Logical Reasoning questions of CLAT. Some of them are given below.

  • It is essential to recognize the conclusions and premises in a particular passage. These conclusions and premises make up the arguments. Identifying them will help you to proceed further.
  • The next step is to determine the tone or theme of the passage. This will definitely help you to answer the questions that follow the passage. If you have successfully decoded the theme or the point of the passage, then it will be easy for you to choose the answers.
  • It is also very essential to understand the view of the passage. It may have more than one view, which again can be contradictory. You must identify and segregate them. This will aid you in realizing if the passage has the main point or if it has several viewpoints.
  • Reading the question minutely is a skill that you have to enhance. You have to figure out the fine details and answer accordingly. The use of the word 'most' in the questions signifies that you have to pick an answer which best suits the question. It is important to read without any distractions and pauses.
  • It is essential to follow the question minutely and leave whatever prior knowledge you have of it behind. The question makers are well aware of this hesitation that might cross your mind. They are most likely intended to test your adapting skills and your ability to soak in new facts and act accordingly without imposing previous knowledge.
  • A question regarding the implication of a particular statement in a passage may be given. In this case, two things need to be done. You have to assess what the statement implies explicitly as well inexplicitly. For this, you have to assess and deduce all possible arguments of the statement for different views. Identification of the theme or the point will be particularly helpful while attempting these questions.

CLAT Logical Reasoning Preparation Books

Books are an inherent source of knowledge while preparing for the CLAT. It is essential to seek the assistance of some books to enhance the knowledge and pass the examination. Some such CLAT Preparation Books are mentioned below.

  • 501 challenging Logical Reasoning Practice Book
  • Universal’s Logical Reasoning for CLAT, LSAT, and other Law Entrance Exams by Jain Prateek
  • Verbal Reasoning by RS Aggarwal
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CLAT Logical Reasoning Topics

The important topics in the CLAT Logical Reasoning Section are as follows-

Statements & Assumptions Direction & Distance Test Blood Relationships
Assertion Analogy Number Test
Statement & Arguments Coding & Decoding Statement & Actions

FAQ's

How to prepare for Logical Reasoning Section of the CLAT syllabus?

You can prepare for the Logical Reasoning Section of the  CLAT syllabus in the following way-
Clear your concepts and understand the foundation of the topics that are included in the syllabus. Refer to good books that are well-approved. You must learn to manage time. You can do this by timing yourself when you solve practice question papers. Practice thoroughly on a regular basis and solve as many mock test papers and previous year papers as possible.

Which books to use for the preparation of Logical Reasoning section in CLAT?

The books to use for the preparation of Logical Reasoning section in CLAT Exam are provided below-

Some such books are mentioned below.

  • 501 challenging Logical Reasoning Practice Book
  • Universal’s Logical Reasoning for CLAT, LSAT, and other Law Entrance Exams by Jain Prateek
  • Verbal Reasoning by RS Aggarwal

How to attempt CLAT Logical Reasoning Questions in the exam?

You can attempt the CLAT Logical Reasoning Questions in the exam in the following  way-

  • It is essential to recognize the conclusions and premises in a particular passage. 
  • The next step is to determine the tone or theme of the passage.If you have successfully decoded the theme or the point of the passage, then it will be easy for you to choose the answers.
  • You have to figure out the fine details and answer accordingly. The use of the word 'most' in the questions signifies that you have to pick an answer which best suits the question. 
  • It is important to read without any distractions and pauses.
  • They are most likely intended to test your adapting skills and your ability to soak in new facts and act accordingly without imposing previous knowledge.
Read the article for more information.

How to practise papers for CLAT Logical Reasoning Preparation?

You can practise the Model papers that are offered by the CLAT Consortium. Apart from this, you can also practice the previous year's question papers from the LNAT and the LSAT. Although the examinations are quite different, it will help you to practice and know more about the topic of logical reasoning. Only with repeated practice can you excel in this section.

How many questions do come from the CLAT Reasoning Section and what are the important topics in this section?

A total of 28-32 questions do come from the CLAT Reasoning Section.The important topics in this section are as follows-

Study of lawResearch aptitudeProblem-solving abilityQuestions based on hypothetical situations
Important court decisionsIndian ConstitutionIndian Penal CodeLaw of Torts
Indian Contract ActLegal Fundamentals & Terms

How to score good marks in CLAT Logical Reasoning Section?

Make sure to cover the topics provided in the syllabus. Attempt as many previous years' papers and CLAT Mocks that are available in the market and make sure to revise them on time. Hard work, consistency, and practice of papers can only help you score good marks in the CLAT Logical Reasoning Section.

Is CLAT Logical Reasoning Preparation possible in 1 month?

Yes, CLAT Logical Reasoning Preparation can be done in 1 month. The important topics in the Logical Reasoning are as follows-Puzzles, Seating Arrangement, Number Series, Blood Relation, and etc. Make sure to cover the complete syllabus including these important topics. Make regular revisions and solve question papers that cover the syllabus topics. These will be enough to score good marks in the section.