The National Law School of India University (NLSIU) conducts the NLAT Exam every year to provide admissions into the different law courses available at the Bangalore University. candidates can go through the complete post to know the NLAT Exam Analysis 2020.

Latest: NLSIU Bangalore released final answer keys for NLAT UG and PG Exam. Candidates can download the NLAT Answer Key to know their chances fo getting selected for the final stage. The results also will be released anytime soon on the official website. 

NLAT Exam Analysis 2020

The exam paper of the NLAT is divided into five sections: English Language, Logical Reasoning, Legal Reasoning, Quantitative techniques, current affairs including General Knowledge. Referring to the NLAT 2020 exam analysis will help candidates to know the difficulty level of the paper and type of questions asked in the exam.

  • NLAT paper analysis 2020 is prepared by taking the feedback from the students who appear for the exam.
  • Candidates must score above the CLAT Cut off NLSIU Bangalore to get shortlisted for the counseling process.
  • In this post, we have provided a detailed NLAT analysis for the year 2020. Check the number of good attempts for each section.
NLAT Mock Test Series 2020

Expert Designed Mock Tests for NLAT Preparation, Topic-Wise Mock Tests with Detailed Analysis Report

Take FREE Test

NLAT Question Papers 2020

Here are the question papers for NLAT UG and PG 2020 Exam. Students appearing for next year exam can download the PDF and enhance their preparation.

NLAT Exam NLAT Question Paper
PG Batch 1 Download PDF
PG Batch 2 Download PDF
UG Batch 1< Download PDF
UG Batch Download PDF
UG Batch 3 Download PDF
UG Batch 4 Download PDF

NLAT Shift Timings 2020

The National Law School of India which was held on 12 September 2020 was conducted in three different shifts. Let us have a look at the table below to know the shift timings and the reporting time of the exam.

Shift Shift Timing Reporting Time
Shift 1 12.30 pm - 1.30 pm 12.00 pm
Shift 2 2.15 pm - 3 pm 1.45 pm
Shift 3 4 pm - 4.45 pm 3.30 pm

NLAT 2020 Paper Analysis

As per the NLAT Paper Analysis 2002, the overall difficulty level of the exam was Moderate-Difficult. The exam consists of a total of 40 questions and 8 questions form each subject. Each question carries 2 marks. The exam was conducted for a total of 80 marks. Let us have a look at the table below to know the number of questions and difficulty level of each section.

Section No. of Questions Level of Difficulty
English 8 Easy
Current Affairs including General Knowledge  8 Moderate
Quantitative Techniques 8 Moderate-Difficult
Logical Reasoning 8 Moderate-Difficult
Legal Aptitude 8 Easy
Overall 40 Moderate-Difficult

NLAT Shift 1 Exam Analysis 2020

As per the analysis, the NLAT exam had a total of four passages. There were a total of 10 questions from each passage out of which 2 questions are asked from five different subjects: English, Legal Reasoning, Quantitative Techniques, Logical Reasoning, and Current Affairs.

  • The paper pattern of the NLAT 2020 exam is different compared to the CLAT exam pattern 2020.
  • There was a negative marking of 0.5 marks for each wrongly answered question and 0.25 marks for unanswered questions.
Sections Difficulty Level
English Easy
Quantitative Techniques Moderate-Difficult
Logical Reasoning Moderate-Difficult
Legal Reasoning Easy
Current Affairs Moderate
Overall Moderate-Difficult

Click here to download Shift 1 NLAT Exam Question Paper

Let us have look at the detailed analysis of the Shift 1 NLAT exam to know the type of passages and its marking scheme.

Passage 1

Check the table below to know the type and theme of the passage and the number of questions from each topic.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Economic Type Theme: Over-reliance on forex reserves
Source: Indian Express
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 2

The theme of the passage was the government strategy to address the impact of COVID in agriculture relies heavily on credit.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Economic Type Theme: Government strategy to address the impact of COVID in agriculture relies heavily on credit
Source: Indian Express
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 3

Check the table below to know the theme of the passage 3 and the source.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Economic Type Theme: Women's right to property ownership becomes right when it yields concrete results in women's favour
Source: Economic & Political weekly
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 4

Here is the detailed list of the number of questions asked from each section and the theme, source, and type of the passage.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Economic Type Theme: The hazards of baing poor
Source: Poor economics-rethinking poverty & ways to end it. Book by Abhijit Banerjee & Ester Duflo
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2
CLAT Online Coaching

100+ Hours Online Live Classes in Hindi & English, FREE Study Material PDF, Mock Tests

Watch FREE Demo

NLAT Shift 2 Exam Analysis 2020

The overall difficulty level of the NLAT shift 2 exam analysis was moderate to difficult. The exam had a total of four passages and there was a total of 10 questions from each passage.

  • The second shift 2 was conducted from 2.15 pm to 3 pm.
  • There was a negative marking of 0.5 marks for each wrongly answered question and 0.25 marks for unanswered questions.
Sections Difficulty Level
English Easy
Quantitative Techniques Difficult
Logical Reasoning Moderate
Legal Reasoning Easy
Current Affairs Moderate
Overall Moderate-Difficult

Click here to download Shift 2 NLAT Exam Question Paper

Let us have look at the detailed analysis of the Shift 2 NLAT exam to know the type of passages and its marking scheme.

Passage 1

Check the table below to know the type and theme of the passage and the number of questions from each topic.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Economic Policy Theme: Delhi government has issued the Delhi Electric Vehicle Policy, 2020, to boost the adoption of electric vehicles (EVs) in the national capital.
Source: mercomindia.com
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 2

The theme of the passage was National education policy 2020 designed to deliver equitable quality public education.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Scheme & Policy Theme: National education policy 2020 designed to deliver equitable quality public education
Source: Scroll.in
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 3

Check the table below to know the theme and source of the passage 3.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on International Affairs/Health emergency Theme: Women's leaders handled coronavirus better than their male counterparts
Source: Scroll.in
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 4

Let us have a look at the detailed list of the number of questions asked from each section and the theme, source, and type of the passage.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on International affairs & Health issues Theme: COVID 19 vaccine
Source: DownToEarth
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

NLAT Shift 3 Exam Analysis 2020

The overall difficulty level of the NLAT shift 3 exam analysis was moderate to difficult. The exam had a total of four passages and there was a total of 10 questions from each passage.

  • As per the analysis, candiadtes will be awarded +2 marks for each correct answer.
  • There was a negative marking of 0.5 marks for each wrongly answered question and 0.25 marks for unanswered questions.
Sections Difficulty Level
English Easy
Quantitative Techniques Difficult
Logical Reasoning Moderate
Legal Reasoning Easy
Current Affairs Moderate
Overall Moderate-Difficult

Click here to download NLAT Shift 3 Exam Question Paper

Passage 1

Check the table below to know the type and theme of the passage and the number of questions from each topic.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Economic  Theme: Data from India's statistics ministry has put a figure on the gloom that has pervaded our economy since the covid pandemic struck
Source: Live Mint
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 2

The theme of the passage was National education policy 2020 designed to deliver equitable quality public education.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Financial Market/economy Theme: The share market is probably the only component of the economy that has recovered fully from the Covid included a slowdown
Source: The Statesman
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 3

Let us have a look at the table below to know the from which source the passage was asked and the theme of the passage.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Health issues Theme: A new framework for the paid period leaves
Source: Hindustan Times
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

Passage 4

Let us have a look at the detailed list of the number of questions asked from each section and the theme, source, and type of the passage.

General Comprehension Passage No. of Questions
The passage was based on Economy Theme: The Himalaya is India's most importnat natural asset. Without them, the country would not Survive
Source: NDTV
English 2
Legal Reasoning 2
Quantitative Techniques 2
Logical Reasoning 2
Current Affairs 2

NLAT Expected Cut Off 2020

NLAT Cut off is the minimum qualifying marks that candiadtes need to score to get admission in the Bangalore University. As per the exam review and analysis, the expected NLAT Cut off 2020 will be around 55. 

The only candidates who will score above the NLSIU Bangalore cut off will be eligible to get admission in the opted course. The cut off marks of NLAT depend on various factors as mentioned below.

  • Number of applicants appeared for the exam
  • The difficulty level of the paper
  • Total number of seats available
  • Category of the candidate
  • Previous year cut off

NLAT Sample Papers for LLB (UG) Exam

To help candidates, we have provided some sample questions for the LLB program. Practicing these questions will help candidates to enhance their preparation for the exam.

Q. The central concern for Indian decision-makers was the continuing influx of Hindu refugees from East Pakistan. Up to the end of July 1971, 7.23 million had taken shelter in India. By 15 December, an additional 2.67 million had poured in. From New Delhi’s standpoint, the continuing flow of refugees gave the lie to the claims about impending normality in Pakistan. Then there was the growing economic burden of maintaining the refugees. The budget presented in May 1971 had provided 600 million rupees for the relief of refugees, but this sum was submerged by the scale of the deluge. In August, the government was forced to present a supplementary demand of 2,000 million rupees. By the third week of September, it was assessed that maintaining 8 million refugees in camps for six months at the rate of just 3 rupees per person per day would amount to 4,320 million rupees— about the US $576 million. The galloping costs of sheltering the refugees made a mockery of the government’s original estimate for the fiscal deficit. 

A prolonged crisis would push the problem to unmanageable proportions.[1] Although a war would entail significant costs, they would be more bearable than the burden posed by the refugees. In July 1971, an assessment prepared by P.N. Dhar, economist and secretary to the prime minister, underlined the potential consequences of embarking on war. The most significant of these would be the position of foreign exchange reserves, which had already worsened in the previous fiscal year. The level of the reserves depended, in the first place, on foreign trade. There was the possibility that India’s trade partners would create difficulties in accepting its exports, so depriving it of foreign exchange earnings. This would “amount to a complete economic blockade.” The second component of the reserves came from foreign aid. Dhar envisaged two scenarios in which the donor countries might seek to coerce India. They might, as with Pakistan, continue committed aid but suspend fresh commitments. Or they might cut all aid, both committed and prospective. In the first situation, India was “not vulnerable on account of foreign exchange” until March 1972. In the second, the amount of aid withheld would almost equal the amount owed by India to its donors in the current fiscal year by way of debt repayment and repatriation of profits. In this situation, India could reasonably threaten to impose a moratorium on debt. “Thus while as an aid-recipient country we are vulnerable to the adverse reactions of the aid-givers,” wrote Dhar, “the size of our debts makes our creditors vulnerable to our reactions. Keynes once said that if I owe you 100 pounds, I should worry but if I owe you a million pounds, you should worry. We owe many millions to our creditors!” [Extracted, with edits and revisions, from 1971: A Global History of the Creation of Bangladesh, by Srinath Raghavan, Harvard University Press, 2013.]

1.1. Assuming that an equal number of refugees came to India each day in the period August 1, 1971, to 15 December 1971, what would be the per-day cost (at the rate of 3 rupees per person per day) of maintaining all the refugees that the government would have to incur as of the end of day on November 13, 1971, in USD terms? (Assume the exchange rate for Indian Rupees and US dollars was constant in the period mentioned).

a. US $ .91million

b. The US $ 1.2 million

c. US $ .82 million

d. US $ .76 million

1.2. The United Nations Convention and Protocol Relating to the Status of Refugees (the “UN Refugee Convention”) provides that “the term “refugee” shall apply to any person who owing to a well-founded fear of being persecuted for reasons of race, religion, nationality, membership of a particular social group or political opinion, is outside the country of his nationality and is unable or, owing to such fear, is unwilling to avail himself of the protection of that country”. Mujib, a Muslim citizen formerly residing in East Pakistan, joins a group of refugees who crossed over to India from East Pakistan in September 1971. Mujib was a member of the Awami League, a party that had campaigned vigorously for the separation of Bangladesh from Pakistan, and had therefore decided to flee to India. Keeping in mind the political circumstances that prevailed at the time described in the passage above, could Mujib claim the status of a refugee in India under the UN Refugee Convention?

a. Yes, since he was unable to claim the protection of Pakistan because of his political opinions.

b. No, since he was not a Hindu.

c. Yes, since East Pakistan faced an impending economic crisis.

d. No, since Mujib should have changed his political opinions and continued to reside in East Pakistan.

1.3. The UN Refugee Convention also states: “This Convention shall cease to apply to any person falling under the meaning of the term 'refugee' if: (1) He has voluntarily re-availed himself of the protection of the country of his nationality; or (2) Having lost his nationality, he has voluntarily re-acquired it.” After the war between India and Pakistan in December 1971, Bangladesh emerged as an independent country, separate from Pakistan. In January 1972, many refugees decided to return to Bangladesh from India, but Mujib continued to reside in India. Based on the information provided, could Mujib continue to claim to be a ‘refugee’ in India?

a. No, since he could easily have acquired the nationality of Bangladesh if he so chose.

b. No, since he could have gone back to Bangladesh after the war.

c. No, since he had supported the separation of Bangladesh from Pakistan.

d. Yes, since he had not voluntarily re-acquired his former nationality nor had he re-availed the protection of the country of his nationality.

1.4. Assume that in 1971, the US provided India foreign aid of USD 500 million, the UK provided India foreign aid of USD 300 million, and Japan provided India foreign aid of USD 10 million. If the Indian government had spent USD 400 million out of all foreign aid received in 1971 on defence expenditure, and if it did not utilise any foreign reserves from foreign aid to maintain refugees until December 15, for how many days would the government be able to maintain the total number of refugees in India as on December 16 utilising only reserves from foreign aid received from the US, UK, and Japan in 1971? (Assume that no more refugees came to India after December 15, 1971).

a. More than 3 months but less than 3.5 months.

b. More than 4 months.

c. Less than 4 months but more than 3.5 months.

d. Less than 3 months.

1.5. Based on his statement, as quoted by P.N. Dhar in the passage above, which of the following would Keynes be most likely to agree with?

a. Being a debtor is better than being a lender.

b. Lenders put themselves in a vulnerable position if they lend too much money to a debtor.

c. Donor countries should always lend money to nations that are in need.

d. Donor countries should never lend money to poor countries

1.6. Which of the following is a strip of land leased by India to Bangladesh, so as to permit access to Bangladesh’s Dahagram-Angarpota enclaves, situated within Indian territory?

a. Dasiar Chhara

b. Tetulia Corridor

c. Tin Bigha Corridor

d. Dahagram

Click here to download the NLAT UG Answer PDF

NLAT Sample Papers for LLM (PG) Exam

Q. Besides the various sources, custom, equity, justice, and conscience has also played a pivotal role in the development of Hindu law, which prevailed. When the law was silent on certain aspects, Judicial decisions also acted as a source of law. Hindu law was not static but always progressive. Slowly necessity was felt for the codification of Hindu law. In particular, women's rights were taken care of, and attempts were made to remove the anomalies and unscrupulous practices. Necessity was also felt after the independence, given the constitutional imperatives to bring about equality of status, the codified law has been amended from time to time. The latest attempt has been made by way of amending the Hindu Succession Act concerning the rights of the daughter to be a coparcener in Mitakshara coparcenary and has been given the rights equal to that of a son.

1.1 The case of Vineeta Sharma v. Rakesh Sharma and Others, C.A. No. Diary No. 32601 of 2018 (the “Vineeta Sharma case”) involved the interpretation of which provision of the Hindu Succession Act, 1956 as amended by the Hindu Succession (Amendment) Act, 2005?

(a) Section 12

(b) Section 6

(c) Section 32(a)

(d) Section 45

1.2 The amended provision of the Hindu Succession Act, 1956 referred to in the previous question provides that “[o]n and from the commencement of the Hindu Succession (Amendment) Act, 2005, in a Joint Hindu family governed by the Mitakshara law, the daughter of a coparcener shall”:

(a) have the same rights in the coparcenary property as she would have had if she had been a son

(b) be subject to the same liabilities in respect of the said coparcenary property as that of a son

(c) by birth become a coparcener in her own right in the same manner as the son

(d) All of the above

1.3 The interpretation of the provision referred to in the preceding two questions was referred to a larger Bench in the Vineeta Sharma case as a result of conflicting verdicts rendered in two Division Bench judgments of the Supreme Court - one was the judgment in Prakash and Others v. Phulavati and Others, (2016) 2 SCC 36 (the “Phulavati case”). The other was in the case of:

(a) Kartick Das v. Kamal Ghosh, (2004) 3 ICC 40 (Cal)

(b) Jalaja Shedthi v. Lakshmi Shedthi, (1973) 2 SCC 773

(c) Danamma @ Suman Surpur and Another v. Amar and Others, (2018) 3 SCC 343

(d) Thamma Venkata Subbamma v. Thamma Rattamma and Others, (1987) 3 SCC 294

1.4 Which among the following did the Division Bench in the Phulavati case hold as regards the provision referred to in the preceding three questions?

(a) That is not retrospective in operation

(b) That it is retrospective in operation

(c) That it is void

(d) None of the above

1.5 Mishra, J., states in the Vineeta Sharma case that “[t]here are two main schools of Hindu law”. One of the schools named by Mishra J. is the Mitakshara school. Which is the other?

(a) Hanafi

(b) Mithila

(c) Benares

(d) Dayabhaga

1.6 To which of the following does the Hindu Succession Act, 1956 apply?

(a) Any person who is a Sikh by religion

(b) Any person who is a Buddhist by religion

(c) Neither (a) nor (b)

(d) Both, (a) and (b)

1.7 Which among the following reflects Mishra J.'s description of the constituents of a Hindu coparcenary in the Vineeta Sharma case?

(a) All the female members of the Hindu joint family

(b) The propositus and two lineal descendants

(c) The propositus and three lineal descendants

(d) All the members of a joint Hindu family

1.8 According to the judgment in the Vineeta Sharma case, “[i]n Mitakshara coparcenary, there is unobstructed heritage, i.e., [x] and obstructed heritage i.e., [y]”. Which among the following correspond to the words replaced by ‘[x]’ and ‘[y]’ in the quoted sentence?

(a) [x] : apratibandha daya, [y] : sapratibandha daya

(b) [x] : sapratibandha daya, [y] : apratibandha daya

(c) [x] : shruti, [y] : smriti

(d) [x] : smriti, [y] : shruti

1.9 Which among the following most accurately describes the difference between ‘unobstructed heritage’ and ‘obstructed heritage’ as set out in the Vineeta Sharma judgment?

(a) The two are the same; there is no difference amongst them

(b) Obstructed heritage refers to situations where the right is created by birth, whereas in unobstructed heritage, the right is acquired not by birth, but by virtue of there being no male issue

(c) Unobstructed heritage refers to situations where the right is created by birth, whereas in obstructed heritage, the right is acquired not by birth but by virtue of there being no male issue.

(d) None of the above

1.10 Which among the following did the Supreme Court hold in the Vineeta Sharma case as regards the Phulavati case?

(a) The Court upheld the Phulavati case in its entirety

(b) The Court overruled the views to the contrary expressed in the Phulavati case

(c) The Court did not pronounce upon the matter

(d) The Court referred to the question of the validity of the Phulavati case to a larger Bench.

Click here to download NLAT PG Answer Ker PDF

NLAT Answer Key 2020

The university will release the NLAT Answer Key on the same day of the exam. Candidates who have appeared for the exam can download the answer key from the official website. NLSIU, Bangalore will release the two answer keys i.e., provisional answer key and final answer key.

  • Candidates can calculate their expected scores with the NLAT Provisional answer key.
  • If candidates found any wrong answers on the answer key. they can file objections on the same to the concerned authority.
  • Candidates need to log in to the site to file objections.
  • The exam conduction body will cross check all the objection raised by students and will make the changes in the answer key accordingly.
  • The Final answer key will be released only after the completion of objection process.

How to Check NLAT Answer Key?

Candidates can follow the instructions mentioned below while checking the NLAT 2020 Answer Key.

  • Visit the official Website of NLAT
  • On the Home Page, click on the NLAT Answer Key Download Link
  • Enter your login credentials such as registration ID and Password
  • Click on the submit button
  • The NLAT Answer Key 2020 will be displayed on the screen
  • Download the answer key and save it for future reference

FAQ's

How can I better prepare for the NLAT 2020 Exam?

Following the expert tips will definitely help you to prepare better for the NLAT Exam 2020. Begin your preparation by studying from the right books which cover all the concepts and topics according to the latest exam pattern and make sure you are aware of the detailed Paper pattern and latest Syllabus of the NLAT Exam before starting your preparation. Taking up Mock Tests regularly and solving Sample Papers helps to test your preparation and improve your speed and managing time.

What is the Theory behind the scoring system for the NLAT 2020?

The scoring system will ensure that candidates do not attempt to guess at the correct answer; further, in combination with a shorter format and fewer questions, this helps ensure that deeper preparation is recognised and rewarded. 

Is the NLAT Exam Pattern same as CLAT Exam?

The types of questions asked, syllabus, and sections included in NLAT 2020 is the same as CLAT. However, the number of questions will be different, test duration will be short, and there will be negative marking even for unanswered questions. 

What are the subjects included NLAT Exam 2020?

The NLAT Exam include four subjects: English Language, Current Affairs Including General Knowledge, Legal Reasoning, Logical Reasoning, and Quantitative Techniques.

What is the marking scheme of NLAT 2020 Exam?

As per the NLAT Exam Pattern, candidates will be awarded with + 2 marks for each correct answer, 0.5 marks will be deducted for each wrong answer, and 0.25 marks will get deducted for wrongly answered question.

What is the time required for preparing the NLAT Exam?

If Studying for 4-5 hours daily, then around 3-4 months is enough for the preparation of the NLAT Exam. After which candidates can begin their revision. Make it a habit to regularly solve the sample paper so that it will make you perfect and also solve at least 3 question papers in a day so that you can have time to improve on weak areas or wherever you go wrong.